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How to Remove Chrome “Managed by Your Organization” in 2022

Sam Boyd Sam Boyd

Short on time? Here’s how to remove Chrome “Managed by Your Organization”:

  1. Remove Recent Apps and Extensions. Uninstall any recently installed applications or Chrome extensions.
  1. Scan Your Device. Use a reliable antivirus like Norton to run a full system scan.
  1. Remove Potentially Unwanted Programs (PUPs). Once the full scan is done, give your antivirus permission to delete all potentially unwanted programs (PUPs) and any other malware it finds.
  1. Stay Safe. Keep your device protected from future infections by choosing a premium internet security package. Norton is the best on the market — it has flawless malware detection and removal, excellent real-time and anti-phishing protections, and useful extras like parental controls, a VPN, and dark web monitoring. You can try Norton risk-free with a 60-day money-back guarantee.

“Managed by your organization” is a legitimate message from Chrome that appears at the bottom of the web browser’s drop-down menu. It means an administrator or program controls your browser’s policies, such as what websites you can access, whether you can use incognito mode, whether you can install extensions, and more.

The message is common on work computers. It indicates that your company’s IT department controls the policies on your web browser. However, if you encounter this message on your personal computer, then a potentially unwanted program (PUP) may be interfering with Google Chrome.

If the “managed by your organization” message has appeared after installing an application or Chrome extension, you should immediately uninstall that application or extension and run a full system scan using a secure antivirus like Norton. Even if you haven’t installed any new software recently, if you’re seeing that message then it’s still a smart idea to run a full system scan.

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Preliminary Step: Uninstall Recent Apps & Extensions 

Here’s how to uninstall applications and extensions on Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome:

For those just needing to run a system scan, you can jump to Step 1.

Uninstall an Application on Windows 11

  1. To uninstall an application on Windows 11, click on the Start button on the taskbar.
  2. In the Type here to search field, type in uninstall.
  3. Under the Best match category, click Add or remove programs.

Preliminary Step: Uninstall Recent Apps & Extensions 

  1. In the window that appears, find the suspicious application you want to uninstall and click the three dots to the right of it. Then click Uninstall from the drop-down menu.

Preliminary Step: Uninstall Recent Apps & Extensions 

  1. Follow the uninstallation wizard’s instructions. When it’s finished, Windows will have fully uninstalled the suspicious application.
  2. Run a full system scan on your computer.

Uninstall an Application on Windows 10

  1. To uninstall an application on Windows 10, click on the Start key on your keyboard, and then click on Settings in the window that pops up.

Preliminary Step: Uninstall Recent Apps & Extensions 

  1. In the next window that opens, click on Apps.
  2. Scroll through the list until you see the application you want to uninstall, then click Uninstall.
  3. Follow the uninstallation wizard’s instructions. When it’s finished, Windows will have fully uninstalled the suspicious application.
  4. Run a full system scan on your computer.

Uninstall an Application on Windows 8

  1. Press the Start key on your keyboard to bring up the Windows “Live Tile” view.
  2. Immediately type control panel. This will cause an icon for the Control Panel to appear on the right-hand side of your screen.
  3. Click on the Control Panel icon to open it, then click on Uninstall a program.
    Preliminary Step: Uninstall Recent Apps & Extensions 

If you can’t see Uninstall a program listed, make sure the View by option in the top right of the window is set to Category.

Preliminary Step: Uninstall Recent Apps & Extensions 

  1. A window will appear showing a list of all installed apps. Scroll down the list until you see the suspicious application you want to remove and click Uninstall.
  2. Follow the uninstallation wizard’s instructions. When it’s finished, Windows will have fully uninstalled the suspicious application.
  3. Run a full system scan on your computer.

Uninstall an Application on Windows 7

    1. Click on your Start menu.
    2. Click on Control Panel.
    3. Click on Uninstall a program.

Preliminary Step: Uninstall Recent Apps & Extensions 

Note: If you can’t see Uninstall a program listed, make sure the View by option in the top right of the window is set to Category.
Preliminary Step: Uninstall Recent Apps & Extensions 
  1. A window will appear showing a list of all installed apps. Scroll down the list until you see the suspicious application you want to remove and click Uninstall.
  2. Follow the uninstallation wizard’s instructions. When it’s finished, Windows will have fully uninstalled the suspicious application.
  3. Run a full system scan on your computer.

Uninstall an Application on Mac

  1. Click on the Finder icon on your Mac’s dock.
  2. Click on Applications.

Preliminary Step: Uninstall Recent Apps & Extensions 

  1. Scroll down the list of installed apps until you see the suspicious program you want to uninstall. Drag it over the trash icon on your Mac’s dock, then drop it into the trash.
  2. Click and hold the Trash icon on the dock until two actions appear: Open and Empty Trash. Click on Empty Trash.
    You can also open the Trash folder and click on Empty Trash in the top right corner.
  3. Run a full system scan on your computer.

Uninstall an Application on Linux

Note: This guide covers how to uninstall an application on Linux using Ubuntu.
  1. Launch the Ubuntu Software Center.
  2. Click the Installed tab to see a list of installed applications.
  3. Scroll through the list until you see the suspicious app you want to remove.
  4. Click on the app, then click the Remove button.
  5. Enter your account password to confirm, and then wait for the uninstallation to finish.
  6. Run a full system scan on your computer.

Uninstall an Extension on Chrome

  1. Click on the puzzle-shaped Extension icon in the top right corner of the browser screen.
  2. Click Manage Extensions.
    Preliminary Step: Uninstall Recent Apps & Extensions 
  3. Scroll through the list of installed extensions until you see the suspicious one you want to uninstall, then click Remove.

Preliminary Step: Uninstall Recent Apps & Extensions 

  1. Run a full system scan on your computer.

Step 1. Use an Antivirus to Identify the PUP Causing the Chrome “Managed by Your Organization” Message to Appear

Important: Don’t connect a phone, USB, or any other detachable storage to your device if you think it may be infected — you risk the virus replicating itself onto those devices.

If you already have (or had) other removable devices attached, you will need to check those devices for infections as well. In this case you’ll need an antivirus that can also scan removable devices.

Open your antivirus software (I recommend Norton) and initiate a full system scan. A full scan will go through every single file, folder, and process on your computer to find any malware  including PUPs, viruses, cryptojackers, browser hijackers, trojan horses, and more. This scan could take a number of hours, so you may want to schedule it to run overnight.

It’s super important that you let the scan finish in its entirety. Even if you see a virus in the infected file list, keep scanning, because you don’t know how many times that infection might have replicated itself, or how many other malware files are on your disk.

When the scan is complete, it will quarantine any malware discovered — including the malware causing Chrome’s “managed by your organization” message. Quarantining suspicious files and apps stops them from causing any further damage. You can then move on to Step 2.

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Step 2. Remove the Chrome “Managed by Your Organization” Infection and Delete Any Other Infected Files

If your antivirus found and quarantined any suspicious files, it will now prompt you to deal with them by deleting the suspicious files. Sometimes antiviruses can quarantine false positives (safe apps that your antivirus mistakenly flags as malware), so if you’re an advanced user, you may want to examine the list before removing everything. However, for less tech-savvy users, I’d recommend just trusting your antivirus — especially if you’re using a quality one like Norton. If you’re really unsure, you can send a scan log or screen capture of the quarantined files to your antivirus’s customer support team.

Once you’ve deleted every quarantined infection (or whitelisted any you definitely trust), you should restart your computer.

While it’s easy to assume you should now be free from malware, some infections can hide traces in your computer’s memory so it’s important to check if they’ve been fully removed. So after you restart your device, run a second full system scan to ensure all traces of the malware have been removed. Many antiviruses, including Norton, remember the files they’ve already scanned and marked as safe, meaning this second scan should complete much faster than the first.

Once again, make sure you let your antivirus completely finish its second scan. When complete, if your scanner flags any more files as compromised, you need to repeat the steps of deleting the infected files, rebooting, and running another full scan. Only once your antivirus’s full scan confirms you have no infections on your device do you know for sure that you’re safe from the immediate threat of malware.

Congratulations — you’ve now removed the unwanted Chrome “managed by your organization” extension and are happy in the knowledge your device is malware-free. However, there are still thousands of malware files looking for the opportunity to infect your devices if you don’t take the relevant precautions. Fortunately, these precautions are easy to implement — which brings us on to Step 3.

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Step 3. Keep Your Device Protected From Other Unwanted Programs

Having had the Chrome “managed by your organization” issue on your device, you already know how easy it is for PUPs and other malware to install on your computer. New malware is being released every single day, so unfortunately it is a constant threat.

However, the good news is that there are many things you can do to keep your devices and your data safe from the threat of malware. Here are the most important:

Keep Your Software, OS, and Drivers Up-To-Date

Although software updates can be annoying, they are one of the most important factors in keeping your devices safe from online threats.

Most software updates are security-oriented — they fix vulnerabilities that can give hackers access to your devices. If your software, OS, and drivers are out-of-date, you are exposed to exploit attacks that enable hackers to crash your system and invade your device with malware.

Many applications come with an auto-update feature, which you should enable wherever possible. Also, some top antiviruses (such as McAfee) have vulnerability scanners that automatically check for and install the latest updates for all of your applications — this can be really helpful for keeping your device as safe as possible.

On Windows, you can also check for updates by accessing the Windows Update dashboard in the Control Panel. Mac users can click on Software Update in System Preferences, and Linux users in Ubuntu can run Software Updater.

Don’t Download Suspicious Files

Only download files from websites you trust and never open email attachments from senders you don’t recognize. And even if you recognize a sender’s name, always check that their full email address is correct before you download any attachments — email is one of the primary methods for spreading malware and fake email addresses using a real person or company’s name are very common.

However, the best way to protect yourself from unsafe downloads is by running an antivirus with good real-time protection. Internet security suites like Norton and Bitdefender can detect and block any suspicious downloads before they even have a chance to infect your device. To put it simply — you should never download anything from the internet without having an antivirus to protect you.

Secure Your Wireless Network

It’s super important to ensure your Wi-Fi network is secure before you go online.  

Unsecured networks are extremely vulnerable because anyone can easily connect to them — and once connected to a network, it is easy for a hacker to infiltrate any devices connected to the same network.

You can check if a network is unsecured by looking at the network connection list. For example, in Windows, an unsecured network will say Open and have a shield warning icon next to it.

Step 3. Keep Your Device Protected From Other Unwanted Programs

To secure your own home network, you need to access your router’s settings. If you’re not sure how to do this, look up your router’s individual model number on Google, check the router’s manual, or phone your router’s tech support team. Once you’ve accessed your router’s settings, create and save a secure password — password managers like Dashlane can generate and store random and complex passwords, which are essentially impossible to crack.

Although secured networks are far safer, bear in mind that connecting to a secured public network can also be dangerous. Although a public network may be password protected, that password is usually handed out to local users, so there’s a chance a hacker is also connected.

Hackers often target public networks and use them to steal other users’ data — including personal information and passwords. Hackers can also use public networks as an entry point to spread malware to other devices connected to the same network. Firewalls will help protect you on public networks to a certain extent, but if you use a lot of public Wi-Fi networks, you should use a VPN to protect your data. VPNs (such as ExpressVPN) allow you to connect from a public network onto a secure private server, hiding your true location and IP address. This means your device and data is securely hidden from any would-be hackers with access to the same public network.

Finally, Internet of Things (IoT) devices have to be secured with password protection as well. Essentially, any device that connects to a Wi-Fi network has the ability to be infiltrated by hackers, who may then steal your data or spy on you (for example, through an IoT camera). To find out how to secure your IoT devices behind a password, check the device’s manual, search on Google, or phone the related tech support team. And then, once again, use a password manager like Dashlane to create a super-strong password that’s impossible to guess.

Download a Secure Antivirus Program

Finally (and most importantly), make sure your computer is protected by using a secure antivirus program such as Norton. Norton comes with many features that help to protect your computer from cybercriminals and dangerous malware. Some of its top features include:

  • Real-time protection. Prevents you from downloading or installing applications that Norton deems dangerous. This includes malware and PUPs.
  • Firewall. Monitors your network traffic and prevents unauthorized connections — such as those containing malicious files.
  • Secure VPN. Hides your location and keeps you protected from data theft when online, especially on public networks.
  • Parental controls. Contains various functionalities to keep your kids safe online, including screen time limitations and content filters.
  • Password manager. Generates and stores complex passwords so that you never have to remember them, or worry about hackers cracking them.

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What does it mean if Chrome is “managed by your organization”?

If your Chrome browser has the message “managed by your organization”, it can mean two things. Either you’re using a work computer and your IT team/management is in charge of Chrome’s policies, or you have a PUP (potentially unwanted program) that is changing Google Chrome’s settings.

If you’re on a work computer, check with your management to make sure they’re controlling Chrome’s policies. If not, or if you’re using a personal computer, this message is likely the result of a PUP or other malware. In this case you should uninstall any recently installed suspicious apps/extensions, and then follow our steps to run a full system scan of your computer using a trustworthy antivirus like Norton.

How can Chrome be managed by an organization?

Organizations have the option to manage Chrome’s policies across all company-owned devices. That means they can control what features users have access to in Chrome, including whether they can install extensions, change the home page, access incognito mode, and so on.

It’s fairly common to see this on a work computer, but not on a home computer. However, personal computers can sometimes show this message if an application on your system has policies that affect how Chrome works. Sometimes this can be caused by legitimate software, but it’s usually the case that you have a PUP (potentially unwanted program) or other malware infecting your computer. In this case, you should follow our steps to uninstall any recently installed apps, and then run a full system scan using a top-quality antivirus such as Norton.

How to remove “Chrome managed by your organization”?

You’ll need to identify the legitimate program or PUP (potentially unwanted program) that is causing this issue. There are several ways to do this, including removing recently installed programs and extensions, which are explained in the above steps.

If Chrome is legitimately managed by your organization (i.e. on a work computer), then you shouldn’t remove it. If it’s a problem, talk to your company’s management or IT team.

However, if “Chrome managed by your organization” appears on your personal computer, you’ll need to identify and remove the issue.

Once you’ve identified the issue, and if you’ve removed a PUP causing the problem, it’s best to run an antivirus scan with a secure anti-malware program to ensure your device isn’t infected with dangerous malware.

Why is my device managed by an organization?

Similar to “Chrome managed by your organization”, “Device managed by organization” is a pop-up message on Android devices that blocks access to things like the settings menu and installed apps menu. This is fairly common on a company device, but if your personal device is displaying this message — it may be infected with malware. You should download a mobile antivirus suite and run a full scan to detect and remove any suspicious apps.

About the Author
Sam Boyd
Sam Boyd
Contributor

About the Author

Sam Boyd is an avid tech fan with a keen interest in cybersecurity products and online safety. When he isn't researching the latest online threats, he enjoys chilling out with some video games and getting outside, exploring new parts of the world with his family.