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1Password vs LastPass

1Password vs LastPass
Felicity Kay
Tags: comparison
Posted: July 1, 2019

1Password vs LastPass: An Overview

No matter where you do your research regarding password managers, you’re going to come across 1Password and LastPass as some of the top brands. However, if everyone keeps naming these two as some of the best brands, how can you be sure which to get? After all, it makes no sense to have two password managers.

Well, I’ve reviewed over 70 password managers, and have a very good understanding as to what makes a good password manager. Check out my thoughts on 1Password and LastPass to see which is the better option for your needs.


1Password vs LastPass: Features

While they don’t differ too much, there are a few features within 1Password and LastPass that make them stand out from the competition. Here are a few of the highlights:

1Password: Emergency Kit

1Password has something called an emergency kit, which is a PDF that you can either print or store on your hard drive that contains your master password, email log-in, and your 1Password-specific secret key for logging in. It’s a great way to keep your information secure and in an unhackable space – the real world!

1Password vs LastPass: Features

LastPass: Security Challenge

LastPass has something called a security challenge that takes a look at all of your imported passwords and assigns them a score. If one of the phrases is below the platform’s threshold, you can have the software change it via its built-in password generator. This is a useful way to make sure your passwords are as secure as necessary.

1Password vs LastPass: Features

1Password: Travel Mode

Travel mode is a fantastic feature that allows you to keep your information completely secure while traveling around the world. Anytime you’re heading somewhere new, you can enable Travel Mode which will lock your information into a secure space within the 1Password vault. If someone takes your phone, you can then access 1Password from another device, log-in, and delete your vault from the stolen phone. Plus, if you’re done traveling and your phone is safe, you can restore all of your information with the touch of a button.

Winner: 1Password

While LastPass is a perfectly passable password manager, 1Password stands ahead of it thanks to its slightly more unique features like Travel Mode or its Emergency Kit.

1Password vs LastPass: Plans and Pricing

Before getting into the details, take note that 1Password doesn’t offer a free plan while LastPass does. The former does offer a free trial, but you have to pay to continue using the software in any capacity. As for LastPass, the password manager has multiple plans alongside a free one that you can indefinitely without paying.

1Password vs LastPass: Plans and Pricing

We’ll go into 1Password’s first, which starts with the personal plan. This offering brings with an application for iOS, Windows, Mac, Linux, Chrome OS, or Android. It isn’t overly expensive either and enables you to store as many passwords as you’d like on top of providing a gigabyte of document storage.

With this plan, you’re also gaining access to Travel Mode, two-factor authentication for added security, and a year-long history to recover any information you may have deleted.

Conversely, LastPass’ personal plan comes in two varieties: Premium or Families. We’ll touch on the Premium first, as it’s most comparable to 1Password’s personal plan. Similar to its competitor, the LastPass premium plan provides 1GB of Premium storage for documents, unlimited storage amounts, and two-factor authentication options.

However, when you get into premium plans, the two begin to differ a little more. LastPass’ families plan is a little bit cheaper than 1Password’s and allows you to have an additional user as well. That and both subscriptions feature password sharing, emergency recovery, and personal vaults on top of the shared one.

Both bring with 30-day free trials as well, but 1Password’s plan has the additional Travel Mode and activity log which give it a few points over LastPass.

Then we have their business plans, in which LastPass has two and 1Password has three. Both have “Teams” as their lowest business plan. They’re the same price and are focused on smaller businesses, especially 1Password’s, which provides a GB of storage per employee, two-factor authentication, administrative controls, and unlimited shared vaults on top of personal ones. LastPass’ plan offers the same features alongside an activity log.

If you have more than 50 workers, you’ll want to jump on LastPass’ Enterprise plan. There are over 100 unique policies to customize, streamlined administrative and permission settings, cloud sign-on, and the plan even includes LastPass Authenticator which is the manager’s own unique form of two-factor authentication.

1Password vs LastPass: Plans and Pricing

1Password’s equivalent is its Business plan, which brings a lot of the same benefits but also provides 5GB of storage per employee, custom groupings, and powerful onboarding options thanks to Okta and Active Directory. However, this plan is a little more per user per year when compared to LastPass.

While that’s it for LastPass, 1Password does have an Enterprise plan which goes higher than LastPass’ offering. As you can imagine, it’s for much larger companies and requires that you call the company to discuss pricing. However, this tier brings with your businesses own account manager, a catered training process, and even an engineer to help your team get started.

Winner: 1Password

While both options here are fantastic offerings, 1Password tends to edge out LastPass with a few unique features on each plan. Of course, the former might cost a little more than the latter at times, you’re getting super useful extra features for the higher fees.

1Password vs LastPass: Ease of Use and Setup

As is the case with most top-of-the-line password managers, installing both LastPass and 1Password is incredibly simple. Both of them have you establish a master password right away as well, and from there you can import any passwords you may have from a previous password manager or web browser.

1Password vs LastPass: Ease of Use and Setup

Once imported, 1Password breaks your information down into credit cards, login information, identities, secure notes, and more. From here, you can tag your entries with custom phrases, like categorizing Facebook as “social media,” for example. Go as crazy as you want here as long as you can remember the categories, that is. As for LastPass, you have a more traditional search function here that works just fine, but it isn’t as easy to categorize and sort things like it is in 1Password.

Both platforms provide a pretty interface to look at, though 1Password kind of buries some of its more useful information, while LastPass is laid out much better. You’ll have no problem finding its more advanced features while browsing, even if it’s your first time.

1Password vs LastPass: Ease of Use and Setup

While 1Password has a desktop application, LastPass focuses more on its browser extension. The former’s browser extension is fantastically laid out and you can access nearly everything from it, which is a nice touch, but the latter almost entirely uses the extension. All this means is that your information is easily available from your web browser and you don’t have to take any extra steps.

Both pieces of software have fleshed out mobile applications as well, that bring with autofill, auto-capture, and a few other quality-of-life features.

Winner: LastPass

While 1Password has a fantastic categorization system, LastPass wins out thanks to its streamlined user-interface that doesn’t bury things in hard-to-reach places. This was a close category like many of the others, but one in which LastPass edges its way to a win.

1Password vs LastPass: Security

LastPass and 1Password both utilize an industry standard AES-256 encryption method on top of a zero-knowledge storage solution, which essentially means that your information is never seen by the company in question. Instead, everything is stored entirely locally on your device. Of course, this means that if you ever lose your master password, you can’t rely on the password manager developers to help you recover it. The security is worth it, however, since it’s very hard for anyone to break in and steal your information.

Speaking of recovery, 1Password does have another option for you in case you forget your master password. This comes in the form of the platform’s emergency kit. Right when you create an account, 1Password provides you with an emergency kit that details your master password, your “secret key” (1Password’s version of two-factor authentication), and a QR code to scan that helps you set up the application on a mobile device. You can either store this emergency kit somewhere on your hard drive or print it out for secure storage. Just make sure nobody else sets their eyes on it!

Both password managers offer emergency recovery options as well, which ensure that you can ask for help from a trusted friend who will shortly gain access to your account to change your master password.

Otherwise, LastPass has something called a “Security Challenge” that takes a good look at all of your passwords and tells you how powerful each one is. If you have a weak password, you can take advantage of the software’s password generator to create a new one for yourself.

Winner: 1Password

While the security challenge on LastPass is cool, 1Password’s recovery kit is next-level. Not only does it heavily imply you to print out your information to keep it secure, but it does so right upon startup so you can’t put the process off until later. It essentially provides you an offline cheat code so you never have to worry about forgetting your login information.

1Password vs LastPass: Customer Support

It’s odd that 1Password is weak in this category considering how it stands out in all of the others. But, those looking for customer support with this password manager can’t rely on a phone line or live chat to get the solutions they need. Instead, they have to stick with the platform’s offered email, Twitter account, or forum post solutions.

That said, the team responds to forum inquiries incredibly quickly, as they’re onboard 24/7. Also, while waiting for your question to be answered, you can browse through the other already asked questions to try and find a solution. Otherwise, there’s a fleshed out FAQ section to take a look at as well if your question isn’t overly complex.

1Password vs LastPass: Customer Support

As for LastPass, this password manager doesn’t fare much better. Not only is customer support hard to find, it basically forces you to search through the forums before you can come in direct contact. Especially considering your paying for services here.

Then, when you finally get to customer support, you have to fill out a ticket and wait for it to go through. There’s no live chat or email support with LastPass. That said, if you’re a free user you’re waiting longer for support than if you’re a paid premium one. Also, there’s no refund policy and the team prefers that you write in English if possible. So, if you don’t know English very well, support with LastPass will be very difficult for you.

1Password vs LastPass: Customer Support

Winner: 1Password

While 1Password’s customer support is nothing to write home about, LastPass’ is much worse. There’s a blatant lack of many different offerings here, and they really prefer English which isn’t exactly fair for some users who aren’t proficient in the language.

The Bottom Line on 1Password vs LastPass

Interestingly, while both of these password managers are incredibly well-known, 1Password edges ahead of LastPass in almost every category. That’s not to say that LastPass is bad by any means, but 1Password just has a little bit more polish and thought put into it.

Transparency and Trust – We pride ourselves on being the only site where users can freely contribute and share their reviews on any antivirus with other community members. When you visit an antivirus site we link to, we sometimes get affiliate commissions that support our work. Read more about how we operate.