1password Pricing: Is This Premium Password Manager Worth Purchasing?

1password Pricing: Is This Premium Password Manager Worth Purchasing?
Laura
BY: Laura
Posted: July 23, 2019

The Canada-based 1Password consistently ranks among the best password managers on the market. However, unlike most password managers, 1Password doesn’t offer its users a free version of its software. 

All of its plans are paid, although you can try the majority of them for free for the first 30 days. So, is 1Password’s pricing fair? We’ve looked at 1Password pricing in-depth to help you decide which option, if any, best suits your individual needs.

Different 1Password Pricing Options

Features Personal Families Teams Business Enterprise
Users 1 5 Unlimited Unlimited Unlimited
Access on all devices Y Y Y Y Y
Zero-knowledge security model Y Y Y Y Y
Password generator Y Y Y Y Y
Save & fill passwords Y Y Y Y Y
Document storage 1GB 1GB 1GB 5GB 5GB
Travel Mode Y Y Y Y Y
Emergency Kit Y Y Y Y Y
Watchtower  Y Y Y Y Y
Guest accounts 5 5 20 20
Admin vault Y Y Y Y
Shared vault Y Y Y Y
Usage reports Y Y
Active Directory and Okta Y Y
Tech support 24/7 email 24/7 email 24/7 email VIP VIP
Multi-factor authentication 2-factor 2-factor 2-factor 2-factor 2-factor

The Best Price Option

Our favorite plan is 1Password’s Families. It costs $4.99 a month, but the value you get is immense, not least because it can be used by up to 5 individuals

For business purposes, we like the Business plan. It’s quite expensive ($7.99 a month per user) but offers many useful features. Perhaps most impressively, every business plan member gets you a free family account. You can’t really beat that!

Option 1: Personal

The best option for single individuals, the Personal plan costs $2.99 a month. It gets you unlimited password storage across multiple devices, as well as other typical run-of-the-mill features that come for free with most other password managers. 

What makes 1Password’s Personal plan special is its Watchtower add-on. This unique extra alerts you to password breaches as well as other security issues. 

The Personal plan also gives you access to Travel Mode and the Emergency Kit. The former allows you to lock away your personal information while you’re off traveling the world. The latter is a document that acts as a recovery tool in case you forget your master password or sign-in key. 

Pros

  • 30-day free trial
  • 1GB document storage
  • 1-year password retention
  • Have I Been Pwned integration 

Cons

  • No autofill without user input
  • Doesn’t support automatic password changing
  • Customer support is via email only

Option 2: Families

1Password Families will set you back $4.99 a month, but you’ll be able to share it with four additional individuals, whether family members or friends. 

The features here are identical to those you’d get if you went for the Personal plan. The only real difference is that each person gets a private vault as well as access to a shared vault

Furthermore, this plan also allows you to invite up to five guests for limited sharing. 

Pros

  • Admin dashboard 
  • Invite more people for $1 a month per user

Cons

  • Customer support options aren’t great

Option 3: Teams

By upgrading to Teams ($3.99 per user per month), you’re gaining access to business-focused features, such as Duo integration which offers business-wide multi-factor authentication

Each team member gets access to a private vault, but they can also view shared vaults. Similar to the Families plan mentioned above, Teams also offers five guest accounts for limited sharing.

Pros

  • Admin dashboard for managing access 
  • Automated sign up 

Cons

  • No phone line or chat support

Option 4: Business

At $7.99 per person per month, 1Password’s Business plan gets you all of the features we’ve mentioned thus far. 

However, this plan also comes with extras useful for larger teams, such as usage reports and Active Directory and Okta integration.

Each Business plan member gets a free family account, which means that you can keep your business and personal data separate.

Pros

  • VIP support
  • 5GB document storage
  • 20 guest accounts for limited sharing

Cons

  • Expensive compared to other password managers

Option 5: Enterprise

The Enterprise plan comes with all of the features mentioned above, as well as a dedicated account manager, an onboard engineer, and a setup training session tailored to your business. 

However, you’ll have to contact 1Password’s customer care team to implement this plan across your organization. 

Pros

  • Ideal for larger organizations 

Cons

  • Custom quote

1Password compares remarkably well to its competitors. The one area where it loses points is its pricing. Nonetheless, 1Password’s features are superb and well worth spending money on. 

Unlike Dashlane, 1Password doesn’t offer its users exclusive add-ons such as Dark Web Monitoring or VPN. Instead, 1Password focuses on being the best password manager out there.

Free vs. Paid PMs

While 1Password lacks a free plan, you can nonetheless try most of its subscriptions for free for 30 days

At $2.99 a month, its Personal plan is relatively expensive, especially when compared to similar plans on offer by 1Password’s competitors such as LastPass. Besides, the latter offers its users a free version too.

However, when you take into account the safety-focused features you get when you opt for one of 1Password’s many plans, 1Password pricing doesn’t seem so steep

As tempting as LastPass’ free version is, its features can’t compare to 1Password’s Watchtower add-on and its Travel Mode. 

Bottom Line

1Password might not offer its users a free version of its service, but the paid plans provided are reasonably priced considering the advanced features they come with. 

We’re especially impressed with 1Password’s capability to streamline logging into sites that use two-factor authentication, eliminating the need for two separate tools.

If there is one area that 1Password falls short on, it’s password exportation. The software can pull data from Chrome, LastPass, Dashlane, RoboForm, and SplashID, but that’s about it. Still, you can always import all of your confidential information via a CSV file. Doing so is annoying, but it gets the job done.